Another One of my Favorite Trees: the Madrona

I recently shared a few of my favorite trees (here if you missed it) but didn’t have room to include them all.  So this post is dedicated to another beauty – the Pacific Madrona – or Madrone if you prefer.

A native of the Pacific Northwest – just like me –  I love its blistering red cinnamon bark,  peeling away to reveal smooth pistachio beneath.

They love to hang out on bluffs and cliffs over water – as here at Deception Pass.  I can still see them in my mind’s eye looking just like this, hovering over Hood Canal where I spent many summers as a child.

I found this giant beauty on a walk at Lincoln Park

and this one at Seward Park glistening in the rain.

Sometimes they grow tall and erect but just as often, they grow twisting and reaching for exactly what I don’t know.

Native Americans used all parts of the Madrona for food and medicinal purposes. Many birds and mammals eat the berries and use the trees for nesting.

Beautiful at sunset this one positively glowed at Seward Park.

~ Susanne

12 Comments on “Another One of my Favorite Trees: the Madrona

  1. I love those trees too! Each one looks so different!
    Up here people call them Arbutus trees.

  2. I had not heard of Madrona trees but these are fantastic! Wow, they are breathtakingly beautiful. Your photos always make me want to be there 🙂 ❤ Thank you for sharing these beauties with us!

  3. Beautiful trees, one of my favorites also. Seems like several years back they were being attacked by a fungus or insect. Are they still having problems.

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