Fresh as a Bird on the First Day of Spring!

After Monday’s deluge by an atmospheric river, Tuesday came along warm and clear, a foretaste of spring.

The juncos dropped by for the fresh green grass.

and the finches came to say hello.

We were all happy.

Sharing with Sunday Stills, Fresh.

~ Susanne

28 Comments on “Fresh as a Bird on the First Day of Spring!

  1. The finches do look happy. ๐Ÿ™‚
    We had rain yesterday, and more rain today. Not a very exciting start to Spring in Beetley.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    • Thanks, Pete. The finch seemed to look right at me and smile! ๐Ÿ™‚ We had so much rain on Monday that Tuesday was quite a surprise! Hopefully the atmospheric river has moved on, but we shall see.

  2. Yay, for birds, bringing us the fresh signs of spring, Susanne! Beautiful captures and I’m hoping we get to see many more. Yesterday above our house, flying along, I saw Canada geese, ravens and turkey vultures. Along with those, I saw two bald eagles, one adult, and one youngster floating along (we’re a quarter-mile from Lake Spokane). The sky was too gray to get a decent pic, plus my camera was in the house–next time! A great start to March! Your last image of the finch just made me smile!

    • Thanks, Terri! Sounds like you hit the jackpot of big birds yesterday! I love having the little birds visit my garden. The finch seemed to look right at me and smile! ๐Ÿ™‚

  3. Pingback: Sunday Stills: Another #Fresh Look Atโ€ฆ – Second Wind Leisure Perspectives

  4. Our juncos (NE Ohio) don’t have black heads – they are slate-gray all over on top. Are these a different species or just a variant ? I’ve read that there are variant colors showing up. Very pretty birds !

    • I live in the Pacific NW. According to the Western Peterson field guide, the variety in my photo is the Dark-eyed Junco, aka the “Oregon” junco. The male has a darker hood than the female. I think the other colors used to be considered subspecies but now all considered one. I believe the one you describe is the slate-colored junco found mostly east of the Rockies.

  5. Our juncos leave here for the summer and don’t return until it is quite cold. Do yours stay year round?

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