‘Tis the Season for Hummers

November has come on strong and stormy as it often does in the Pacific Northwest. Perhaps that’s why I’m seeing more hummingbirds at the feeders; it’s easier for them to get their food fast and ready to go without fighting against the wind and the rain.

I cleaned and refilled both feeders on Saturday and waited nearby for them to appear.

Then this morning I saw one overhead in the evergreen tree as I stood on the deck. He seemed a bit smaller than the others, perhaps a youngster? Or maybe he only looked young all fluffed up to stay warm. Either way, he completely charmed me as he turned this way and that while I took pictures.

Afterwards he buzzed down to the feeder while I stayed behind taking pictures from a distance.

Even so, he seemed to look right at me, as if thanking me for the food.

The pleasure is all mine.

~ Susanne

33 Comments on “‘Tis the Season for Hummers

      • You’re welcome, they love it here even though the winters are slightly cool. Question – do any other bird species try to land on your feeder, and also try to feed? I put a regular seed feeder up several weeks ago and the Rock Pigeons took it over right away. It’s gone now.

      • No, nothing else can drink the nectar from the tiny holes, for which hummingbirds are specially equipped. I usually don’t put out food for the other birds since they find insects and seeds from my garden, except maybe during the winter snow. Even then I haven’t attracted unwanted birds.

      • Okay, thanks, Susanne. Those pigeons are a problem in this city, I think of them as flying rats! πŸ˜‚

      • We have them too but not in our neighborhood. Mostly in the parks near the water. I like all birds but wouldn’t want them in my yard either.

    • Thanks so much! I wish I could capture them in motion but they’re too fast for me! My best bet is finding them feeding or at rest. 😊

  1. You took some amazing photos Susanne! Hummingbirds are so damn charming, they always remind me of my mom! Thanks for sharing! πŸ’•C

  2. I’ve read that population of hummingbirds has been on the decline for several years. Habitat loss, climate change, and the fragmentation of their breeding ground all appear to be factors.

  3. You caught those spectacular hummer feather colors so well. Loved these!

  4. I tend to miss them when the porch hanging flowers give up the ghost. I know they can winter over here, but I don’t feed them on their own. I am glad to get to see yours.

    • I’m happy you enjoyed the pictures. I love that the Anna’s are here year-round, though I worry about them when the cold and snow comes.

  5. Love the hummer pictures, of course! Is that an Anna’s? Throat looks purple, tho. So beautiful!

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